A Texas-sized dilemma looms over shutdown vote

When the US Congress fails to pass appropriate funding for government operations and agencies, a shutdown is triggered.

The vote on the bill, which will keep the government funded through February 16th, was largely along party lines, with 224 Republicans voting for it and 186 Democrats voting against it.

Republican leaders attempted to lure Democrats to support the bill by including a six-year reauthorization of the Children's Health Insurance Program, which provides services for 9 million children nationwide, including roughly 40,000 in Nevada. Republicans hold a razor-thin 51-49 majority in the Senate, and need 60 votes to overcome parliamentary maneuvers and stop a filibuster. The group met with Trump Administration officials on Wednesday and they will convene again on Thursday.

KELSEY SNELL, BYLINE: Hi there.

"The overwhelming number in our caucus have said they don't like this deal and they believe if we kick the can down the road this time we'll be back where we started from next time", Schumer said.

Apart from Democrats, some Republicans - including Sens. How did they manage to come to an agreement?

But that number is likely even higher, as several Republican senators, including Mike Rounds of South Dakota and Lindsey Graham of SC, also said they're prepared to vote against the plan.

But even House passage would leave unresolved months of partisan arguments over immigration, big spending and more.

As of late yesterday, there was no visible sign that Republicans who control Congress would meet Democrats' demands for including a plan for the "Dreamers" in the temporary spending bill.

Now, that would include money to fully fund construction of a border wall, and it would require employers to use a controversial E-Verify system to check the status of their workers. "We are strongest when we stick together - that will produce the best spending deal and the best DACA deal - one that has a chance of being enacted into law", he wrote in a note to Republicans.

"It's clear that they don't have the votes in the Senate right now and the primary reason they don't have the votes in the Senate is no one in the Senate, least of all Majority Leader McConnell knows what the president wants", Giangreco said. What are they asking for? He added that in return for protecting the young immigrants, "what they want in return is continuously a moving target and it continuously expands".

"We are asking Congress to act, the time is now, because tomorrow, there will be no time", Bastien said.

Barring a last-minute pact between the two parties on spending and immigration disputes that have raged for months, lawmakers said a measure financing agencies for just several days was possible to build pressure on negotiators to craft a deal. "So how do you stand up here and say you want to deal with these things?" The only difference is they get it at the end of the shutdown. And there's a serious lack of trust up here. He had spoken to the president an hour and half before, he said, and Trump was on board. In the past, however, they have been repaid retroactively even if they were ordered to stay home.

In September, Trump said he was ending former President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (Daca) programme that has been shielding around 700,000 of the immigrants, who are mostly from Mexico and Central America.

Mexico is disputing President Donald Trump's claim that it is the "most unsafe country in the world".

  • Leroy Wright