Senate Health Bill: Dayton Disabilities Advocates Raise Alarms Over Medicaid Cuts

As debate continues over the Senate health care bill, Senator Ron Johnson (R-Wisconsin) stood strong Friday in his decision not to vote for the bill as written.

Other Republicans in the Senate are reserving their complete support, saying they require more time to digest the 142-page bill and consider its implications. "If President Trump thought the health care bill in the House was mean, I can tell you that the Senate Republican plan is downright nasty", Menendez said.

AHIP isn't taking a formal position on the bill, and the group said measures to shore up the individual health insurance market are largely positive.

"If our Republican colleagues were proud of this bill, there'd be a brass band down the middle of Fifth Avenue and every street in America", said Schumer, the Senate's minority leader. Erasing Obama's law has been a marquee pledge for Trump and virtually the entire party for years, and failure would be a shattering defeat for the GOP.

Under the plan, states could drop benefits that were required under Obamacare, formally known as the Affordable Care Act, such as maternity care, emergency room services and mental health treatment.

Sandoval, a Republican who chose to opt into expanding Medicaid, said 210,000 received health coverage because of the decision.

"No argument against Trumpcare is more eloquent than the grave consequences it means in people's lives", she wrote colleagues.

And they would bar people from using tax credits to buy policies that pay for abortion and also block Planned Parenthood from getting any money from Medicaid for a year. Paul said, "My hope is not to defeat the bill". However, the four senators do appear open to negotiations and amendments that could turn their "no" to a "yes".

Menendez said the Senate's bill to repeal Obamacare could ultimately slash $30 billion in Medicaid funding in New Jersey, where more than a half-million people enrolled under Medicaid expansion could lose coverage.

In an interview with Fox News Channel, Trump was asked about the four conservatives opposing the bill. "We'll have to see".

Cruz, in a separate statement, said, "As now drafted, this bill draft does not do almost enough to lower premiums". The bill "rolls back the ACA's Medicaid expansion - making for deep spending cuts to that program, compared with current law".

He becomes the fifth GOP senator to say he will not back the bill as it is now written, and the first in Senate Republicans' so-called moderate wing.

Republican Senator Rob Portman says he looks forward to reviewing the Congressional Budget Office's fiscal analysis of the GOP proposal.

  • Joanne Flowers