Over 50 Possibly Killed in London Tower Fire, PM May Admits Failings

"If the inquiry says it's got to be banned in this country and it's got to be torn off every single building that's got it and we have to re-clad those buildings whatever the cost - will the Government pick up the tab for that too?"

Theresa May has admitted that the support given to families in the hours following the Grenfell Tower fire "was not good enough".

She also said the government had now contacted all local authorities in England asking them to identify any safety concerns in light of the tragedy.

He said there were roughly 2,500 similar apartment towers throughout Britain.

Prime minister Theresa May's government earlier sought to quell anger over the disaster, pledging to support the victims after protesters jeered her when she visited residents. Some said they had never seen a building fire advance so quickly.

"At No 10 yesterday, the Prime Minister assured the group that from now on residents would be consulted on a coordinated relief effort".

The cause the blaze is still under investigation, but anger has mounted in the community amid reports that exterior panelling used in an extensive renovation completed a year ago may have been banned by United Kingdom rules. "The bodies of 16 people have been recovered from the building and taken to a mortuary", he added, while the figure of 58 may rise. The package is also to include a commitment to ensure that all who lost their homes are re-housed as soon as possible near where they lived, temporary accommodation is paid for and that all victims are consulted during a public inquiry into the fire. The inquiry will report back to the Prime Minister.

The new exterior cladding used in a renovation on London's Grenfell Tower may have been banned under United Kingdom building regulations, two British ministers said Sunday as police continued their criminal investigation into the inferno that killed at least 58 people.

The tragedy has provoked a huge response from nearby communities.

Khan, who grew up in public housing, said locals are still angry at the "poor response" from the local and federal government both before and after the tragedy - echoing an angry op-ed he wrote for The Guardian Sunday. More than $3.8 million has been raised for the victims. Residents want answers on why the fire spread so quickly, trapping numerous estimated 600 residents.

Downing Street says affected families can access the cash payment immediately from the council "as and when" they need it. Numerous displaced are living in churches and community centres. There is ample food and water, but very little privacy or proper bedding, and with the tower destroyed, no one knows where they will be relocated or for how long. The BBC understands it could be around 70 people in total.

Scotland Yard has said the rescue operation by emergency services on the site will take weeks and the death toll is also expected to rise further, though not all victims may be identified due to the nature of the burns.

  • Joanne Flowers