United Kingdom royals honour London fire victims as anger mounts

Addressing the British people on her official birthday, Queen Elizabeth wrote of a "very sombre national mood" following a "succession of awful tragedies" that have befallen the British people over the last number of months.

As public anger swelled at the unknown death toll - there are 30 confirmed fatalities so far, with dozens more unaccounted for - Downing Street said May was meeting a 15-strong group of victims, residents and volunteer workers at her office.

The 91-year-old monarch said it is "difficult to escape a very somber mood" on what is normally a day of celebration.

An emotional Prince William described the tragedy as "one of the most bad things [he's] ever seen".

The Queen and her grandson Prince William Friday visited the scene of the Grenfell Tower fire to meet survivors and rescuers.

The British capital was also struck by a terrorist attack earlier this month, in which eight people died when three attackers drove into pedestrians on London Bridge and then went on a stabbing rampage.

"United in our sadness, we are equally determined, without fear or favor, to support all those rebuilding lives so horribly affected by injury and loss", it added. The emergency services expect to find no more survivors from Wednesday's tragedy.

Prime Minister Theresa May woke up Saturday to an onslaught directed at her and the Conservative government in the national media.

May was criticised for avoiding locals when she visited the burnt-out shell of the 24-storey tower on Thursday and faced cries of "Shame on you" and "coward" when she returned the following day.

UNITED KINGDOM, Rosyth: In this Ministry of Defence handout picture Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh (L) in a ship naming ceremony conducted at Rosyth Dockyard in Rosyth, Scotland on July 4, 2014. She addressed worries that victim's voices "will not be heard". She says "the support on the ground for families who needed help or basic information in the initial hours after this appalling disaster was not good enough".

"Both myself and colleagues from London Fire Brigade have already said it will take weeks".

The government has promised a full public inquiry, but that has done little to a sense of frustration at the lack of information about how the fire moved so quickly to engulf the building.

  • Salvatore Jensen