Taoiseach Holds Meeting With DUP Leader

Theresa May needs the votes of the 10 DUP MPs to prop up her minority administration as she hopes to steer government business - including crucial measures on Brexit - through the Commons.

The Irish republican Sinn Fein party which won seven seats in the election although MPs traditionally do not take up their seats in protest is also wary of the alliance. Instead, she found the opposition Labour Party unexpectedly making a strong second-place showing and national politics thrown into disarray.

The leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) says talks with the UK Prime Minister Theresa May to support a new government are going well.

He added: "I'm sure we all look forward to welcoming the Queen's Speech just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated".

"The last thing we want to see is one or other of the communities so aggrieved that the hard men, who are still there lurking in the corners of the communities decide to return to some form of violence", he said.

As Mrs Foster met with her MPs in Westminster, she said: "The future's bright", prompting Ian Paisley junior to respond: "The future's orange". Their worry is that it may make the negotiations a little skewed as it may feel like the British government is backing the DUP in talks rather than being objective.

Brussels, The European Union (EU) and the European Commission (EC) said in a joint statement that they have set a date to begin Brexit talks with the UK.

Michael Gove, a former leadership rival, who was appointed environment secretary after losing his post as justice secretary in May's cabinet reshuffle previous year, said the PM is the ideal candidate to lead the country through Brexit.

A deal with the DUP also risks destabilising Northern Ireland by increasing the influence of pro-British unionists. "Unless the Irish Government is keeping them to that responsibility they will behave as they have behaved as long as I have lived".

Speaking at Leinster House, the Sinn Féin leader, Gerry Adams, made a stinging attack on the prospect of an agreement between the Conservatives and the DUP.

Both London and Dublin must "recommit to the word, spirit and implementation of the Good Friday Agreement" if power sharing at Stormont is to be re-established, she said.

Macron said the door was "always open" for Britain to remain in the European Union as long as the negotiations on Brexit have not finished.

"My preoccupation is that time is passing, it is passing quicker than anyone believes because the subjects we have to deal with are extraordinarily complex".

As European leaders tried to fathom exactly how Britain would begin the negotiations, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said Germany wanted a Brexit deal that would limit negative consequences for the bloc but also did not want it to weaken Britain.

  • Zachary Reyes