Theresa May Warned Over Northern Ireland Unionist Deal, Power Sharing

British Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative party resumed talks on a deal to prop up her minority government yesterday as she faced a battle over her Brexit strategy just days before European Union divorce talks are due to begin.

Sir Major told BBC Radio 4's World at One that if the Conservatives "locked" themselves into a deal with one of the main parties in Northern Ireland, there was a danger the government would no longer be seen as an "impartial honest broker" in restoring the power-sharing arrangements and upholding NI institutions.

But a deal with the DUP risks destabilising the political balance in Northern Ireland by increasing the influence of pro-British unionists who have struggled for years with Irish Catholic nationalists who want Northern Ireland to join a united Ireland.

Her most senior minister Damian Green has confirmed the Queen's Speech setting out the Government's programme could be delayed if a deal is not reached in time for it to go ahead on Monday as planned.

DUP leader Arlene Foster has said even though the party opposes same-sex marriage, it is "nonsense" to call the party homophobic.

Corbyn warned against a "coalition of chaos" between the Conservatives and the DUP and said Labour was ready to provide "strong and stable leadership", mocking two slogans used by May during the campaign.

"The DUP may never have the political arithmetic so favorable again so like the Conservatives, the DUP will want to avoid another election and will want to keep drinking in the political free bar that is available to it", Tonge said.

The British chancellor, who has reportedly argued for keeping Britain in the customs union, is expected to set out the government's stance on Brexit next Thursday.

The former Northern Ireland First Minister said her meeting with Mr Varadkar was very good and that she was looking forward to a very positive relationship with the Irish premier.

An agreement between the Tories and DUP is thought to be close, with Mrs May saying the talks had been "productive" and emphasising the need for "stability" in government. Some involved in the Irish peace process are alarmed because the 1998 Good Friday peace accords call for the British government to be neutral in the politics of Northern Ireland.

She reportedly apologised to Tory MPs, accepting personal responsibility for failing to win an outright victory and sacrificing the parliamentary majority she inherited from David Cameron when she became leader after the Brexit referendum previous year.

"Bringing stability to the United Kingdom government in and around issues around Brexit, obviously around counter-terrorism, and then doing what's right for Northern Ireland in respect of economic matters".

"We have worked as a party with the DUP before and those are productive talks".

Discussions in Westminster are continuing without Theresa May after she left for Paris for a pre-arranged meeting with newly elected president Emmanuel Macron.

  • Leroy Wright