No deal yet between Conservatives and DUP to back PM May

May and Northern Ireland Secretary James Brokenshire will meet the party leaders in London "to build on the political discussions that restarted on Monday in Belfast", Brokenshire said.

Detractors of the pact include former Conservative prime minister John Major, who said it risked Westminster's neutrality in an ongoing and fragile process. The deal that will ensure DUP support over the coming months has yet to be finalised, its content remains speculation.

May has been holding talks with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), keen to get the backing of their 10 lawmakers in Westminster's parliament to return to government after failing to win a majority in last week's British election.

Government sources suggested that the Conservatives do not necessarily need an agreement with the DUP before Wednesday, because the DUP would be unlikely to support the opposition Labour Party and its leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Ahead of the meeting with May, Sinn Fein Stormont leader Michelle O'Neill said that any deal between the Conservatives and the DUP in Westminster can not be allowed to stand in the way of the Good Friday Agreement, which sets out the power-sharing process in Northern Ireland.

"And the question arises, if they cease to be seen as such by part of the community in Northern Ireland, then one can't be quite certain how events will unwind".

"We have just finished a meeting with the British prime minister and her secretary of state and we told her very directly that she was in breach of the Good Friday agreement", Adams said. "I think one of the most shameful aspects of the whole Brexit process from the beginning to now has been the disregard shown by many for that peace process".

Deputy Leader Nigel Dodds is leading the DUP delegation to London as party leader Arlene Foster has returned to Northern Ireland, the spokesman said.

During the appearance, Ms O'Neill said: 'We made very clear to the prime minister that any deal between herself and the DUP can not undermine the Good Friday agreement.

That laid out the remaining obstacles to power-sharing in Northern Ireland, he said.

  • Leroy Wright