"Anxiety and fear" in N. Ireland over Conservative-DUP talks-Sinn Fein

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after a meeting with the Leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Arlene Foster at 10 Downing Street after the general election in London, Tuesday, June 13, 2017.

The party, which traditionally takes its Westminster offices but does not sit in the Houses of Parliament, said its MPs will continue to boycott the Commons.

The new United Kingdom government is yet to take a final shape despite announcement of new Cabinet members as a final deal with the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) gets worked out.

The source said talks with the small Northern Irish party were progressing well as meetings in Downing Street with all of the British province s main political leaders were taking place.

The source said the talks to leave the European Union would not be delayed, removing the question mark over the negotiations being derailed by May's lack of a parliamentary majority lost in an election she did not need to call.

Negotiations on Britain's withdrawal from the European Union will begin between British and EU officials on Monday, the British government said in a statement today.

Ms May is now engaged in talks with the Democratic Unionist Party over a so-called "confidence and supply" arrangement that give the Conservatives a majority in the House of Commons and the ability to form a government.

The proposed deal would see the DUP back the Conservatives in votes on the Budget and on any confidence motion while other matters would be negotiated on an issue-by-issue basis.

She said: "I will be making it very clear that any deal between the Tories and the DUP can not be allowed to undermine the Good Friday and subsequent agreements".

Their influence on the British government is a cause for deep concern that must be addressed to assure the public and political parties of the independence of the talks process.

But there is no possibility that she will pull out of the still, not over the line deal with the DUP, required by her to form a government.

May has dismissed calls to resign following the dismal election result after calling a vote three years early in the hope of bolstering her slim majority ahead of the Brexit talks.

It follows claims by the Sinn Fein president that a referendum on Irish unity is inevitable.

"The power-sharing institutions collapsed because of the DUP's RHI financial scandal and the refusal of previous Tory governments and the DUP to implement previous agreements".

For Labour, shadow business secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey said the prospect of a Conservative-DUP deal was "worrying", telling BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "It would create a lot of instability in terms of the peace process in Northern Ireland".

  • Leroy Wright