X-ray services at Basingstoke hit by cyber attack

At least eight Australian businesses have been hit by a global cyber attack, but the country appears to have avoided the worst.

"They have been working I know through the night nearly to make sure patches are in place to make sure that hopefully the NHS services can get back to normal", he told BBC radio.

But computers and networks that hadn't updated their systems were still at risk.

The Hampshire Hospitals NHS Trust statement said that emergency services were continuing as normal and any patient with an appointment should attend as expected, unless specifically contacted by the hospital.

Dr Chinthapalli, a neurology registrar at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, said: "Some people have said I predicted this but that's not quite right, I was warning about this and saying that attacks were likely to be imminent this year".

Capitalising on spying tools believed to have been developed by the U.S. National Security Agency, the virus...

Since Friday's breach more than 200,000 victims - including York Teaching Hospital Trust and Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust - across 150 countries have been infected by the Wanna Decryptor ransomware, also known as WannaCry.

Wainwright said he was anxious that the ransomware attack might spread further once people return to work on Monday and log on to their computers.

Europol Director Rob Wainwright told ITV's Peston on Sunday programme that the attack was indiscriminate.

"There has been one incident of the ransomware hitting a business here in Australia and there could be two other incidents where it has occurred, although we are trying to confirm that", Mr Tehan told Sky.

A spokesman for the trust said: "Barts Health staff have been working tirelessly over the weekend, using tried and tested processes to keep patients safe and well cared for".

The NHS says it employs more than 1.5 million people, making it one of the world's biggest employers alongside the US Department of Defence, Walmart and the Chinese army.

He said this latest attack was a reminder of the importance of good digital hygiene. Spain did not say which companies were affected, but Telefonica, a telecom giant said it had detected an incident which affected some of its employees. Countless other companies were affected, with Russia, Ukraine and Taiwan suffering the most, according to cyber security firm Avast.

Darien Huss, a 28-year-old research engineer who assisted the anonymous British researcher who stopped the virus from spreading, said he was "still anxious for what's to come in the next few days because it really would not be so hard for the actors behind this to rerelease their code without a kill switch or with a better kill switch".

By then, the "ransomware" attack had hobbled Britain's hospital network and computer systems in several countries, in an effort to extort money from computer users. You're only safe if you patch ASAP.

  • Zachary Reyes