How to avoid the ransomware attack

In the United Kingdom, the National Health Service has been forced to cancel operations today within its hospitals after computers used to share patients' test results and scans with doctors remain frozen.

The NHS has been declared "open for business" after a crippling ransomware attack left large swathes of its services paralysed over the weekend.

"Companies need to make sure they have updated their systems and "patched where they should" before staff arrive for work on Monday morning," he said.

The Russian Interior Ministry and Health Ministry also said earlier in the day that they have "repelled" such attacks as the virus was promptly detected and localized, according to Russian news agencies.

"I'm anxious about how the numbers will continue to grow when people go to work and turn on their machines on Monday", he said.

Over the weekend, a malicious global cyber attack which locks computers and holds users' files for ransom, hit over 75 countries, with one Australian company so far likely to be one of those targeted.

At Broomfield Hospital, part of Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust (Midlands & East), trauma patients are being diverted to Southend University Hospital.

Patients with an appointment should attend as normal, unless specifically contacted by the hospital.

BLOOD tests will resume at hospitals across mid Essex following the NHS cyber attack last week.

"Most have found ways of working around this but seven, including St Barts in London, have asked for extra support".

It is understood the number of systems affected at each of the Scottish health boards fell into single figures - bar NHS Lanarkshire where more machines were affected.

"Although we have never seen anything on this scale when it comes to ransomware attacks, they are relatively common and there are things that you can do, that everyone can do, all of us can do, to protect ourselves against them", he said. "The fact is the NHS has fallen victim to this".

MalwareTech, who wants to remain anonymous, was hailed as an "accidental hero" after registering a domain name to track the spread of the virus, which actually ended up halting it.

The anonymous specialist, known only as MalwareTech, issued a warning that hackers could upgrade the virus to remove the kill switch.

  • Arturo Norris