BC minority could have major implications for Alberta

The ruling Liberal Party squeaked to victory in British Columbia elections, but it lost its majority after 16 years in power as the left-leaning New Democrats picked up seats, preliminary results showed. On election night she said she is confident the party's standing may improve, with a narrow decision in Courtenay-Comox that could give the B.C. Liberals a bare majority if absentee ballots favour her candidate.

Many swing ridings were won with small margins, so the final seat count could shift after absentee ballots are tallied and judicial recounts are conducted.

The online survey of nearly 700 voters found more than half would be upset if the BC Liberals assembled a majority (57 per cent) or minority (53 per cent) government.

The LNG industry is a nonstarter, he told reporters later.

In a news conference, Clark confirmed that British Columbia Lt. -Gov.

With the vote count not complete, the Liberals, which are not linked to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's federal Liberal Party, had won 43 seats in the 87-seat provincial legislature.

Horgan said he and Weaver agree that the Liberals have failed British Columbians on many issues.

The Greens' historic gains on election night leave Mr. Weaver with a hard choice: Will he prop up Ms. Clark's Liberals, or topple them and give Mr. Horgan his support?

The campaign began four weeks ago with Clark and the Horgan locked in a tight race to be premier, and Weaver hoping to build upon his one seat in the legislature.

"I want to work with him, I really do, and I've tried and I've continued to try but he's got to control his temper. That would be a long-term win for them so that's one they may be willing to risk in supporting the NDP", said Harrison.

A woman arrives at a polling station to vote in the provincial election in the riding of Vancouver-Fraserview, in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.

In the run up to the election, Weaver said that he had three make or break issues when it came to propping up a party in power, including ending corporate and union donations, a referendum on some form proportional representation, and a significant increase in education funding. And here tonight, we have been presented with an opportunity by British Columbians to open a whole new dialogue in our province, in our legislature.

Weaver spoke briefly with Liberal Leader Christy Clark and NDP Leader John Horgan, but he said it was too early to make any decisions about forming coalitions or informal working agreements with the other parties. The NDP had only a marginal 0.14 per cent bump in popular support to 39.85 per cent. The NDP has promised to ban the donations, while the Liberals have said they'll convene a review panel.

Depending on the outcome, British Columbians may be in for a new NDP government that would aim to block the Kinder Morgan pipeline twinning, and potentially unravel BC Liberal megaprojects like the Site C dam and Massey Bridge, while raising taxes on the wealthy and providing new subsidies for child care and to aid renters.

  • Leroy Wright