Bill O'Reilly doesn't discuss harassment claims

Following an explosive New York Times report that O'Reilly and Fox News had paid around $13 million in settlements addressing complaints brought by five of the conservative host's previous female colleagues, several advertisers moved to remove their commercials from the hit show.

"We regularly evaluate our media buys to ensure alignment with our corporate values, and in light of the recent allegations we have chose to pull our upcoming ads from The O'Reilly Factor", T. Rowe Price said in a statement reported by The Daily Beast.

T. Rowe Price Group, the Baltimore-based money management firm, has joined Mercedes-Benz and a raft of other advertisers pulling their ads from Bill O'Reilly's top-rated Fox News show after allegations that he sexually harassed several women.

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By late Tuesday afternoon, another automaker - Mitsubishi Motors - said it chose to pull its ads.

A Fox News spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

T. Rowe Price:"We regularly evaluate our media buys to ensure alignment with our corporate values, and in light of the recent allegations we have chose to pull our upcoming ads from The O'Reilly Factor", the global financial firm said. "We will continue to closely monitor the situation but believe this is the right decision at this time".

"As a company, we seek to partner with companies and programming that share our values of inclusion and diversity", Hyundai said in the statement.

GlaxoSmithKline: The Pharmaceutical maker said "We have temporarily put a hold on spots running on The O'Reilly Factor while we assess this situation".

"On this program tonight, we will not insult your intelligence by pretending otherwise", Lemon said on his show.

Her attorney, Lisa Bloom, called on the Human Rights Commission in New York City to open an investigation into O'Reilly's alleged behavior.

For some companies, the decision to pull ads from "The O'Reilly Factor" isn't only a matter of protecting their brand - it's also a question of taking employees' sensitivities into account. All except Bernstein's involved sexual harassment claims.

Henry Holt & Company, O'Reilly's publisher, said a year ago that his "Killing" franchise - a series of historic blockbusters that examine the deaths or attempted assassinations of various figures from Jesus to JFK - had sold 14.5 million copies.

Reached by CNNMoney, a spokesperson for Henry Holt said the publisher had no comment at this time.

In a statement over the weekend, 21st Century Fox stood by Mr O'Reilly while adding that it "takes matters of workplace behaviour very seriously".

21st Century Fox referred PEOPLE to Fox News, which did respond to a request for comment. "Killing the Rising Sun", the latest installment of the series about the United States' bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - has been on the New York Times' best seller list for 28 weeks. "But you're the one whining now".

  • Salvatore Jensen