Texas lawmaker wants to fine men $100 for masturbating

The bill, called the "Man's Right To Know Act", would require men to wait 24 hours between having an initial doctor visit for elective vasectomies, colonoscopies and Viagra prescriptions and require a rectal exam, which the bill itself says isn't medically necessary.

She said the "emission should be considered an act against an unborn child".

"An attending physician must administer a medically-unnecessary digital rectal exam and magnetic resonance imagining of the rectum before administering an elective vasectomy or colonoscopy procedure, or prescribing Viagra", it reads.

Moreover, the bill would result in the creation of a booklet with information regarding the pros and cons of these procedures, and would enable doctors to refuse to do any of these things on the basis of "personal, moralistic, or religious beliefs".

A Texas lawmaker is proposing a bill that would require men to be masters of their own domain. or be prepared to unload $100 in fines.

Fed up with the slew of bills regulating women's health care, Rep. Jessica Farrer, D-Houston, has put forth a bill on the final day of legislative filing that would penalize men for "unregulated masturbatory emissions".

Texas's Republican-dominated legislature has passed several measures meant to reduce the number of abortion providers and the number of abortions performed in recent years, part of a nationwide trend of conservative-backed measures passed since the Republican wave of 2010.

The bill is satirical, but as Farrar told The Houston Chronicle, it's not amusing. She claims that nowadays women do not find it amusing when they need to confront with the laws imposed by the state which seems to disrupt their capability to access health care legally.

To that end, Farrar is calling for a "Hospital Masturbatory Assistance Registry" to store semen "for the purposes of conception for a current or future wife". "When a woman has to have a trans-vaginal ultrasound, it has nothing to do with her healthcare", she explains.

Farrar's attempt to highlight the multiple pieces of legislation that have been proposed in the state to limit women's reproductive rights hasn't gone unrecognized, at least not on twitter. "One of the state's objectives is to guilt her into changing her mind". Tony Tinderholt, who once proposed a bill that would have criminalized abortion for patients and their doctors, told the Texas Tribune that he was "embarrassed for Representative Farrar". "But the state's conservatives were dealt a blow past year when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that two provisions of a 2013 Texas law were unconstitutional". This session, she's spoken against bills that would require hospitals to bury or cremate fetal remains (similar to a state rule that was recently blocked) and that "would charge both abortion providers and women who receive an abortion with murder", the newspaper writes.

  • Joanne Flowers